Illustration of risk assessment with caution icons

Five Qualities of a Good Use Risk Assessment (uFMEA)

Not all use risk assessments are created equal. As a human factors researcher at Design Science, I have worked with a variety of Use Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (uFMEA) assessments for a wide range of medical products to identify hazards and ways to mitigate them. If there is one key takeaway from these experiences, it would be that there is a right way and a wrong way to complete an assessment. Read more

Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Ways You’re Hurting Your Video Analysis

This blog post is part two of a two-part series on using video records in contextual inquiry.

In part one Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Reasons to Film Your Research,” we discussed five reasons to film your research. One of the biggest advantages of filming your research is that you can analyze the video after the research has concluded.

In video analysis, you codify behaviors or events to put quantitative values to qualitative observations. These quantitative values can be a useful way to quickly and simply communicate your findings. Video analysis has been a staple of behavioral research methods for a long time, but there’s surprisingly little information about how to do it effectively. Read more

Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Reasons to Film Your Research

This blog post is part one of a two-part series on using video records in contextual inquiry.

Design Science researchers almost never go into the field alone—we’re accompanied by a videographer, who may be carrying up to 5 cameras. The ability to film in restricted areas like operating rooms and catheter labs is something that sets Design Science apart, and with good reason: it’s difficult to gain permission to film in an operating room. It requires long-standing relationships with surgeons, physicians, nurses, and the medical facilities they work for. These relationships are built on complicated, time-consuming navigation of hospital approvals, and repeated positive experiences with our researchers and videographers. Read more

Design Department Attends First Annual SciViz Conference

This month, Design Department team members watched the sun rise over the New York City skyline while traveling to attend the first annual SciViz Conference. This day-long symposium on data visualization and other intersections of science and art showcased the great diversity and nuance of work in this field—and effectively turned the notion of science visualization as a clear-cut, linear process of data input to infographic output on its head. Our two Design Researchers, Christina Stefan and Yeri Kim, and our Design Intern, Audrey Blanchard, attended. Read more

Vector illustrations of various organs within the human body

DS Designer Creates Downloadable Organ Icon Set

Looking for icons to represent all the sections of the brain? How about an icon representing a bodily system like the nervous system? As a company that often uses iconography to create easily understood deliverables, we often find ourselves scrolling through a host of websites, looking for specific medical icons without success. Read more

Illustration showing arrow from France and Germany to Philadelphia

The European Perspective: American Work Culture

This year, Design Science is excited to host our first ever international short term employees! Audrey and David both have European backgrounds, living and working in France and Germany, respectively, before joining Design Science. Audrey is working in the Design Department and David is working with our Human Factors team. We asked them to speak a little about the work culture of the United States, versus the working culture of their home countries. Read more