Image of a person in scrubs standing next to a cadaver draped in a sheet

5 Tips for Your First Study in a Necropsy Lab

Why Use Cadavers?

The study of human anatomy using cadavers dates back to roughly 300 BC, when the Greek physician Herophilus started to use dissection to understand human anatomy. Since then, cadavers have served as a major aid to education and research. For medical students learning anatomy and surgeons perfecting their instrument techniques, cadavers provide physical training materials. What’s more, human cadaver tissue can be used to gain important information about product development and use on human tissue before the device is used in clinical settings. Read more

The Unique Insights of Home Visits

At Design Science, our research most often focuses on the environments of medical professionals—ORs, cath labs, clinics. Yet some of the most rewarding research I have conducted here has involved visiting patients’ homes. Accompanied by a videographer, I’ve traveled past cornfields and baseball diamonds to meet families that are coping with serious conditions and investigate how they are wielding the medical tools and technologies they need to lead fuller and more independent lives. Read more

Getting to the Root

Human behavior can be hard to predict and even harder to explain. Study participants will often manage to do similar things in different ways, and they’ll rarely work with the same tools with equal proficiency.

What seems chance, or random, for one participant may be choice, or regular, for another. But the difference between chance and choice is critical when evaluating medical devices. Read more

A Guide to Trainings

As a recent addition to the Design Science team, I know that there is a steep learning curve when it comes to the specific tools and skills needed for usability testing. There’s a lot to learn, from the nuances of interview styles and follow-up questioning to the requirements of study documentation and reporting. Thankfully, an effective training program can make all the difference when navigating this curve.

What makes a good training program? How do you prepare for one? Are all trainings created equal? Read more

Illustration with Eyeo logo

Design Science Attends Eyeo Festival 2016

How can experiencing information be poetic? What tools are at the forefront of data visualization? Should (ro)bots be designed more like C3PO or Iron Man? Read more

Design Science attends NAB Show’s Post Production World Conference

Video is at the core of Design Science’s work. It documents our studies, drives our analysis, and forms a crucial part of our deliverables. For our videographers, staying on the cutting edge of industry trends keeps our footage off the cutting room floor. Read more

Innovation for all – European Innovation Workshops in Inclusive Design

Innovation for all – European Innovation Workshops in Inclusive Design

On May 12th and 13th, 2016, Principal Steve Wilcox attended the fifth Innovation for all – European Innovation Workshops in Inclusive Design, held at the Norwegian Centre for Design and Architecture (DOGA) in Oslo, Norway. Read more

Design Science Attends 2016 HFES Symposium: Shaping the Future

The recent HFES Symposium in San Diego brought together human factors’ professionals from across the globe to discuss the future of the field. In line with the theme of this year’s conference—Shaping the Future—attendees presented on new lines of research, applications of technology, and opportunities to enhance the safety of medical devices and health care practices. Read more

Image of plane flying over globe

Testing Abroad: Lessons from the Field

Conducting usability studies abroad is an exciting opportunity for researchers. For those who get to travel to new places, you get to see another part of the world, eat new foods, and learn new customs. There are many resources available with tips and suggestions on how to plan an international trip—but planning a vacation abroad and planning a usability study abroad are two different things. Read more

Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare: Shaping the Future

HFES Presentation: Improving IFUs with Eye Tracking, Human Factors, and Design

Are you attending the 2016 International Symposium on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care: Shaping the Future? If so, be sure to check out our presentation on how to improve your Instructions for Use (IFUs). Peter Sneeringer, Director of Human Factors, and Lindsay Carrabine, Design Director, will provide their first-hand perspectives on how to optimize the IFU creation process. Read more