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Illustration of risk assessment with caution icons

MDO Article: Five Qualities of a Good Use Risk Assessment (uFMEA)

What makes a use risk assessment good? Researcher Bryon Calawa answers that question in Design Science’s latest guest column for MedDeviceOnline. Read more

Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Ways You’re Hurting Your Video Analysis

This blog post is part two of a two-part series on using video records in contextual inquiry.

In part one Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Reasons to Film Your Research,” we discussed five reasons to film your research. One of the biggest advantages of filming your research is that you can analyze the video after the research has concluded.

In video analysis, you codify behaviors or events to put quantitative values to qualitative observations. These quantitative values can be a useful way to quickly and simply communicate your findings. Video analysis has been a staple of behavioral research methods for a long time, but there’s surprisingly little information about how to do it effectively. Read more

Video Capture and Analysis: 5 Reasons to Film Your Research

This blog post is part one of a two-part series on using video records in contextual inquiry.

Design Science researchers almost never go into the field alone—we’re accompanied by a videographer, who may be carrying up to 5 cameras. The ability to film in restricted areas like operating rooms and catheter labs is something that sets Design Science apart, and with good reason: it’s difficult to gain permission to film in an operating room. It requires long-standing relationships with surgeons, physicians, nurses, and the medical facilities they work for. These relationships are built on complicated, time-consuming navigation of hospital approvals, and repeated positive experiences with our researchers and videographers. Read more

Image of a person in scrubs standing next to a cadaver draped in a sheet

5 Tips for Your First Study in a Necropsy Lab

Why Use Cadavers?

The study of human anatomy using cadavers dates back to roughly 300 BC, when the Greek physician Herophilus started to use dissection to understand human anatomy. Since then, cadavers have served as a major aid to education and research. For medical students learning anatomy and surgeons perfecting their instrument techniques, cadavers provide physical training materials. What’s more, human cadaver tissue can be used to gain important information about product development and use on human tissue before the device is used in clinical settings. Read more

Image of plane flying over globe

Testing Abroad: Lessons from the Field

Conducting usability studies abroad is an exciting opportunity for researchers. For those who get to travel to new places, you get to see another part of the world, eat new foods, and learn new customs. There are many resources available with tips and suggestions on how to plan an international trip—but planning a vacation abroad and planning a usability study abroad are two different things. Read more